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Daniel Shin

Daniel Shin is the cybersecurity researcher at the Center for Legal & Court Technology (CLCT) at the College of William & Mary and is actively participating in the activities of the Commonwealth Cyber Initiative’s Coastal Virginia Node. Shin is working in the fields of cybersecurity and supply chain protection, deepfakes, and machine learning assisted cyber and information security intrusion techniques. Shin is working to bridge the gap between the legal and the technical fields in the areas of emerging technologies.

With the rise of 5G, internet of things devices are forecast to proliferate across all sectors of society. The ubiquity of internet-connected devices gives rise to a unique set of challenges from the legal perspective, and understanding these legal risks is necessary to mitigate potential liabilities. Our legal system assigns special protections to Personally Identifiable Information (PII), and the rise of data breaches involving PII triggers multiple data protection laws and regulations that might not be well known within the cybersecurity community. Traditionally, the development of cybersecurity has been primarily driven by the computer and technical science community. However, the emergence of ransomware and other data breach incidents underscored the legal dimension of cyber intrusions. Shin’s research highlights the need for the legal community’s contribution to the future development of cybersecurity. Measuring cyber risks now requires an assessment of the legal risk, forcing organizations to consider complex and often multi-jurisdictional regulatory regimes when assessing the soundness of their systems. His research underscores the need for attorneys to play a more active role in the area of cybersecurity.

He previously interned for the Office of Chief Counsel at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties at the U.S. Department of Justice. Shin is admitted to practice law in the Commonwealth of Virginia. 

Shin received a B.A. from Northwestern University and M.A. from the University of Mannheim in Germany. He received his J.D. from William & Mary Law School, where he was a CLCT graduate fellow.